One thought on “Raising of Lazarus Duccio di Buoninsegna 1311 Kimbell Art Mus Ft Worth

  1. In this Duccio di Buoninsegna piece, the person in the yellow cloak and black boots appears to be concerned about any smells that might come forth along with Lazarus. It is interesting that while this is not an icon, no one’s name in Greek and Christ’s halo is missing the cross parts, the trees, mountains, perspective point, and overall style are in the tradition of iconography.

    I have probably seen the piece in person as I have been to the Kimbell Art Museum, but it was a number of years ago while I was at university in Texas, so I don’t remember for sure if it was on display when I was there. And speaking of art museums in Texas, there are some nice ones. I do highly recommend visiting the Kimbell as well as the two museums the Kimbell is in the midst of, Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, if given the chance. The DFW area is blessed with a large number of really great art museums. In addition to those three in Fort Worth, Dallas has the Dallas Museum of Art, the Nasher Sculpture Center, and the Crow Museum of Asian Art in the Arts District (home to the world’s greatest concentration of buildings designed by Pritzker-winning architects) and the Meadows Museum at Southern Methodist University. Meadows has earned the nickname Prado on the Prairie because its ties to Madrid’s Museo del Prado and the University’s collection of 10th to 21st Century Spanish art that is among the largest and most comprehensive outside of Spain.

    And while DFW has most of the good art in the state, Houston has two museums I’d recommend, The Houston Museum of Fine Arts, which has a lovely painting of Saint Veronica’s cloth, and the Rothko Chapel, which houses a large collection of Mark Rothko paintings, all in various shades of purple, and is therefore best visited during Lent. The “Chapel” is next to a Roman Catholic university but is not connected to the school or any other denominational body.

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